Tuesday, 30 December 2014

London Welsh School seeking new home in King Edward VII Park, Wembley

The Bowling Green Pavilion, King Edward VII Park
The London Welsh School, currently housed in a building close to Stonebridge Primary School, is looking for new premises due to the proposed expansion of that school.

Stonebridge Adventure Playground, as readers know, is fighting its proposed closure as a result of the Stonebridge School expansion as well as Council proposals to end its funding.

The Welsh School (Ysgol Gymraeg Llundain), a registered charity, is a bilingual primary school of currently around 30 pupils. Wembley Matters visited the school when it was first threatened in 2013.
LINK

 It had its second application  to become a free school turned down by the DfE earlier this year. LINK


Ariel view of Pavilion
After an exhaustive search the Welsh School governors and parents see the only option as building in the currently disused Bowling Green in King Edward VII Park, in Park Lane Wembley.


The plans are for a new building between the pavilion and the bordering back gardens in Princes Court. Some of the residents have objected on grounds of noise, additional traffic and loss of parkland. The Pavilion would also form part of the school with a possible dual use for the Freinds of King Edward VII Park.

The new building planned would be single storey and the Welsh School, following objections, has moved the building 4 metres away from the garden boundary which will be planted with dense shrubbery and trees. They have also agreed to retain a large Norway Maple and other specimens on the site but the revised planting shows the removal of  3 Irish Yew trees and 1 Monterey cypress. They are identified as category B trees which I believe are trees identified as of moderate quality or value capable of making a significant contribution to an area for 20 years or more.


Proposed land swap
The proposed land swap to make up for the loss of public park space is perhaps the most
controversial part of the proposal. The proposed land is next to Collins Lodge, which is currently temporarily occupied to safeguard the building. Some park users claim that the land, currently registered as residential, is already part of the park, at least visually, as it is a lawned area surrounded by low railings. The removal of the railings would be all that was required to make it formally part of the park.

Abandoned area next to Collins Lodge

Arguing that this is not a sufficient land swap to make up for the loss, attention has shifted to land on the other side of Collins Lodge which was previously used for storage and maintenance but now, as can be seen from the photograph, in a very sorry state.

It is an eye sore that would improve the park considerably if it was reclaimed as parkland.


Others have suggested that this could be a better site for the proposed school building.

Another issue that the Planning Committee would need to consider is vehicle access to the proposed new building. There have been problems in the past, including collapsed drains,  with access to Park Lane Primary School, which is closer to Park Lane itself but where vehicles have to access the school through the path into the park.The park gates are locked at night.


The path to the Bowling Green
Access to the proposed Welsh School would be through the same gate but would carry on through the park on what is little more than a footpath.

Large delivery vehicles, waste collection vehicles and emergency vehicles would all have to access the school along the path which is used by pedestrians  including children and their families enjoying the park.

Clearly there is a safety issue here and the path itself may need to be reinforced and perhaps widened affecting the amenity value of the park.

The full details of the planning application can be found HERE

Wembley Central Councillor Sam Stopp has asked for the views of Wembley residents on this proposal. Contact details:
Bus. mobile:  07721 233 038
Bus. email:  cllr.sam.stopp@brent.gov.uk


The Planning Committee will visit the site about 9.35am on Saturday January 10th and the application will be decided by the Committee on Tuesday January 13th, 7pm, Brent Civic Centre.

62 comments:

  1. Great pics, Martin. And that drone someone gave you for Christmas was an inspired choice. Lots more aerial shots in 2015, please!

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  2. Yes great photos Martin.

    Revised landscaping plans were submitted after the consultation period ended and show the removal of 3 Irish Yew trees and 1 Monterey cypress. They are identified as category B trees, which I understand to be trees of moderate quality or value capable of making a significant contribution to an area for 20 years or more. The removal of these trees is contrary to the design and access statement submitted by the school, which stated the proposal would "retain and develop the dense planting on the south and west boundary".

    With regards to refuse collection, the school state in their design and access statement that they will store refuse in two wheelie bins and "it is anticipated that the small extent of refuse generated...will...be taken off site by parents." They do not state where the refuse will be taken to. It seems far from ideal for public park users to have to share the footpath with persons wheeling refuse bins out of the park.

    There are also serious highways issues associated with the proposal. No travel plan has been submitted with the application. There is no designated drop off or pick up area for vehicles and the neighbouring residential road is a cul-de-sac with only one entrance and exit, so using that could block access to and from that road (and has been noted by some residents as already being the case with parents using the road to drop off and collect children from neighbouring Park Lane School). Local Wembley residents will be aware that Park Lane itself is a busy road already frequently congested with long tail backs of traffic. The proposal falls within Public Transport Accessibility Level 4 that at minimum would expect parking provision for operational needs and disabled parking, which this scheme does not provide.

    At present the proposal is recommended for grant by the planning department and is proposed to be decided by councillors at Planning Committee on 13th January 2015.

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  3. Additional comment received from a resident by email: I agree with your comments regarding the controversial proposed land swap. This open space already forms part of the visual amenity of the park and the proposal would on this basis result in a net loss of open space. Policy 2.18 of the London Plan calls for the protection, promotion, and management of London’s network of green infrastructure. The All London Green Grid (ALGG), which supplements the London Plan “aims to conserve landscapes and the natural environment and increase access to nature.” Brent Council within the Brent Valley and Barnet Plateau Area Framework based on the ALGG lists King Edward VII Park as part of the Wembley Area Green Grid, which proposes to improve access to existing open spaces and improve their quality. Furthermore, National Planning Policy Framework paragraph 74 states “Existing open space, sports and recreational buildings and land, including playing fields, should not be built on unless: the development is for alternative sports and recreational provision, the needs for which clearly outweigh the loss

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  4. If the space is to be developed it should be for the greater good of the local community. A space that is for the public. A prime example is Queens Park which has been developed to provide access for all the community. There is the animals, paddling pool and sand pit area and the local wild life area, Cafe etc. Surely such ideas would be better placed to a school. The borough is being developed continually and there most be spaces better placed for a school within the borough. Any development within the park should be for enjoyment of park users.

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  5. This comment has appeared on StreetLife (via Kilburn Times)


    Its interesting that people aren't outraged at the idea of King Eddy's park being used in this way...or that they aren't commenting about this proposal. We use this park daily, and in my opinion its nicer than Barham. Although I am a supporter of the Welsh School, it does concern me that King Eddy's park is actually losing its land, and its community features......albeit little by little .. the grass tennis courts...it used to have a water feature and a 9 hole pitch and putt...the bowling club used to be popular and I have no idea why it closed down...There are so many issues regarding this proposal...I just hope wembley residents who use the park have their say.

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  6. Looks like Sam Stopp and Krupa Sheth have latched on to this now. Hopefully they'll be able to speak up for residents...

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    1. ha ha, hi Sam

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    2. Sam Stopp is too busy sending lots of love and kisses to Gordon Brown if his twitter account is anything to go by.

      https://twitter.com/CllrStopp/status/539570848840298496

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  7. Could be a tad awkward for Stopp and Sheth. Many of the parents and so forth are also Brent residents. Indeed, the ones I know fought Gladstone School.

    Is there any reason Collins Lodge itself could not have been used? And of course, if Cricklewood, Kensal and Barham Park hadn't now gone forever, there might have been scope there! I do wonder how hard Brent worked to help the school, given it's them who are displacing the thing.

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  8. Conversion of the Lodge to a school would involve change of use of course. It is a lovely buulding that merits preservation. There has been talk that it could be converted into a park cafe.

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  9. A cafe would be good. Brent has lost far too many buildings over the last few years: I still mourn Dollis Hill House.

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  10. The school has said in their application that there's a shortage of primary school places in Brent. However, Welsh school being independent and a fee paying school (charging £860 per term for children aged 5 years old and older) is effectively a private school. It does not follow the English National Curriculum and as such can not be considered to be providing Primary School places for the local public.

    With regards to alternative sites - How about Cottrell House on Wembley Hill Rd? They have space for classrooms, catering facilities on site and an open concrete area in front which could perhaps be relaid as a playground.

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    1. Free schools don't have to follow the National Curriculum or even hire qualified teachers for that matter.
      Of all the free schools that have been thrust upon Brent, this seems to be the only group with any dedication to the community.
      Their site is another matter.

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  11. The Welsh School isn't a free school. It is run by a charity, has (or perhaps had) some funding from the Welsh Assembky, and charges means tested fees, I am not sure if it would qualify for free school status if it applied as it follows a Welsh curriculum. Intriguing.

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    1. They applied twice to become a free school. Limited information about their rejection is available here: http://academiesweek.co.uk/private-welsh-primary-fails-in-second-free-school-bid/

      It certainly doesn't fit the mold.

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    2. Thanks. I have put the information in the body of the story with a Link.

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  12. It's hardly been "thrust on Brent" either. It's existed for over fifty years, in Brent, with mostly Brent children attending. They don't get Welsh Assembly funding any more, although I think they had a little in the past. It's been very much run on a shoestring, with parents often contributing way over the means tested fees and doing copious amounts of fundraising. As far as I know the teachers have always been properly qualified and paid. It is indeed a Welsh curriculum. The ex pupils I know have gone on to do really well after primary level and at university.

    (Yes, bit of a soft spot for them, they're utterly dedicated and have had very little support from anyone.)

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    1. Indeed, it is a wonderful school which works tirelessly to keep afloat. I meant the other groups were thrust upon Brent.
      Wish we could swap the approval of the others and approve the Welsh school instead.

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    2. 19:58 - thank you for clarifying that - and yes, the others do seem to be thrust upon us, to quote Malvolio. ;)

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  13. Eleri Brady of the Welsh School has sent in this comment:

    As you are aware from our submission, our Registered Charity consists of an exceptionally small school (no more than 40 pupils from the local area) which will have a negligible impact on the wonderful character of the Park and will not require any alterations to access pathways within the Park. We have been working closely with Brent's Parks and Landscaping Department and if our application is successful we would operate wholly within the Park's management regime and Park opening hours. We can assure you that retaining the existing high quality character of the Park is of paramount importance to us.

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  14. In case you missed the update elsewhere on this blog, the Brent Planning Officers have recoemmnded that the Welsh School's planning application be approved. It goes to Planning Committee on January 13th (Civic Centre 7pm) and the committee will make a site visit at about 9.45am on Saturday Januarty 10th. You can ask to speak on the application at the committee meeting by contacting:

    Contact: Joe Kwateng, Democratic Services Officer 020 8937 1354, Email: joe.kwateng@brent.gov.uk

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  15. I am an ex parent of the Welsh school and a Brent resident. I am also a governor of the school. My son attended the school throughout his primary years and moved on very happily from there to our local comp. He is completely bilingual in Welsh and English and it’s fantastic that he feels an affinity to Welsh culture but also feels like a real London boy as the School has always made every effort to connect with the community around it in Harlesden. We're enormously grateful to Brent and Stonebridge School for the support they've given us over the years. And the school is now over 50 years old! Our funding does come partly from the Welsh government and from donations by parents and friends of the school. No child is turned away however - the ethos of the school is that of a state school and we follow the Welsh state curriculum. Our teachers are highly qualified and are particularly keen to reach out to the community. Although the school is a Welsh medium school the parents reflect a cross-section of multi cultural Brent and some of the children speak three languages.

    As a parent who has been completely grateful for the brilliant facilities my local park has provided over the years, I do understand the concerns of local residents about losing any part of their park. I know that the school will make every effort to contribute to the local community and to make the landscaping as pleasant as possible.

    We have looked far and wide for another site – and are really grateful to Brent for their help in this matter. This site appears to be the only realistic proposition given the timescale and money involved. We would love to invite local residents into the school – and to make ourselves an asset to the local community.

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  16. I asked Eleri Brady, Chair of Governors of the London Welsh School, about the future of the Bowling Green in King Edward VII Park, which the Pavilion used to serve. It is not part of the land the Welsh School wishes to acquire. Here is the response:

    Thank you for kindly adding my comment. We also appreciate you bringing the Officers report to our attention, we believe it is a concise, fair and balanced report. We have always had the utmost respect for the professionalism of Brent officers and our engagement with all the relevant Departments bears this out. We have sought genuinely to address any neighbours' concerns, so much so as we've amended the proposal which has reduced our previously small playground significantly. We have, throughout our existence as a school been very good neighbours at the centre of the community and very much hope we can continue to address our neighbours' concerns and have written to all those who are concerned inviting them to our school or to discuss any outstanding issues. We also understand that there has been a letter of support from immediate neighbours.

    We do very much appreciate the interest you have shown to our school's plight as often the smaller and vulnerable minorities in this wonderful multi-cultural Brent (which has always been our proud home) struggle to be heard, and believe me, our Charity has always struggled to survive and has done so because of the passion and commitment of the parents and friends and our application offers a (and possibly only) sustainable future for this key part of the Welsh speaking community of Brent.

    I'm afraid we can"t help you on the Bowling Green itself as its outside our prospective demise. Our application only relates to the Bowling Pavilion and the small area to its south and west. However we understand the Parks Department are proposing to integrate this Bowling Green area in to the wider Park to maximize the benefits to the wider community, a move we very much support and look forward to understanding more about. We have and will always be (as long as we exist) a community based school and any proposal which maximizes the wider community benefits of such a wonderful park will always have our support.

    I hope this helps but please get in touch if you have any other queries. We are happy for you to share this response on your Blog.

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  17. All residents on Princes Court immediately bordering the bowling pavillion site object to this proposed development in King Edward VII Park.

    Serious concerns have been raised about the possible use of Princes Court (being the nearest side road to the park) as a drop off and pick up point that would cause congestion to a residential road, which being a cul-de-sac has only one vehicular entry and exit point. Park Lane itself often has stationary traffic queues.

    My understanding is that the proposal was amended following the council's tree officer requiring that the category B Norway Maple tree and other planting be retained, and requesting a more detailed landscaping plan from the school. They are proposing to remove 4 other trees, as Martin notes in the article.

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  18. If the building is to be used, it should be for the community,an educational resource centre, youth club are but just a few suggestions. Brent council are trying to push this through on the basis of education. Its a school, that is registered as a charity but is fee paying. So how is it helping with school places as the parents who would send their children there are doing so through choice free school places are not available. If there is not suitable accommodation in Brent and the pupils who attend are from Brent and Ealing are there no suitable alternatives in Ealing.

    I maybe cynical but the park is a very beautiful place pictures of a fee paying school in a public space does not sit right with me. Its a public space which should be used and developed for the public.

    A small school in a picturesque park would look brilliant on the school brochure, which would gain greater interest and in time an application would be made to increase the size from 40 and an application will then be made for the single storey to be made into a double storey.

    Bowling is not a dying sport and this is what's being touted. How has Brent supported the bowling club to increase its member. Lots of people weren't aware of who to contact to join as the two previous members who ran the club actually resided on Princes Court and have now left the area.

    It is sad that Brent have not supported the school better in finding adequate accommodation and it seems that as an after thought the current location is being offered. If it was a state school I am sure more effort would have been made. But just in the surrounding area of Princes Court there are numerous primary schools - so providing more spaces is not a true statement in the planning application. As I highlighted earlier the spaces are available to parents who choose to pay fees. There are at least two fee paying schools in the area and both are based in large houses. Why is this school so different it needs to be based in the park. Parks are for the whole community and any development should be just that for the whole community. If planning permission is to be granted it should be for educational need of the whole community. If a Free School was not granted permission in Gladstone Park why should the Welsh school be placed in a park. Public spaces should remain public spaces. Karen

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    1. I second these very good points! I hope you will attend the park this Saturday morning. If you haven't already done so, I urge you to contact Councillor Sam Stopped to put forward your points. He has said that he said that he will speak at the planning committee meeting on 13th Jan to represent residents. He needs to hear from more local residents! Cllr.Sam.Stopp@brent.gov.uk

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  19. The London Welsh school is the only Welsh outside of Wales and that is commendable and great that the Welsh community is catered for but its an Indpendent School which does not follow the english school curriculum. They are stating the max number of students will be 40. How many children are there of Welsh heritage in Brent? What is the percentage that attend the state sector primary schools within Brent in comparison to the London Welsh School? Its a question of choice and fees.

    As a business it will need to ensure it generates enough money to survive and that is the reality so why is it emotions are being used in my opnion. It does not matter what size the school is it has no place to be situated in public park land that my council tax monies are used to maintain.

    The school has a bigger plan which will only be further revealed if they are succesful.

    why has a site not been sought in Ealing as there is a connection to that borough. Is it that the school does not wish to locate as they are being offered a prime location for nothing. That makes it easy to say no for other site due to cost. Being a business you would need to review and amend the school business plan.

    The park is a public domain and needs to remain so

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  20. Brent is trying to pull the wool over our eyes.

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  21. The only comment in support of this planning application is listed as in Toley Avenue, which is no where near the site. None of the residents on Princes Court immediately neighbouring the bowling pavilion site support this proposal.

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  22. What exactly is going on???? It clearly seems that the council were not expecting the residents to oppose the proposed planning application. How comes a resident in Toley Avenue is supporting the application yet residents and parks users aren't even aware that Brent have recommended to push the application though. Locals were not aware of the availability of the proposed site.........

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    1. Exactly, what is going on?????!!??

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  23. 13 comments of support plus Toley Ave, so that's 14 in support when I had a look on the website last night. Most of the 13 appear to have some sort of affiliation with the Welsh school and don't live on the two roads where properties close to and bordering the site were sent letters informing them about the planning application (Princes Court & Keswick Gardens.)

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  24. I get that ppl are frustrated but Sam Stopp has said he will raise these concerns at the committee so i dont think its a lost cause

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    1. That's news to me. When did Sam Stopp say he would raise these comments at committee?

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    2. Have you been on his website and seen the contributions from people on here saying that he's supportive of the residents? He's barely shut up about it.

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  25. Pure shambles and foul play.... hidden agendas. Please stop saying the school is charity. It's an independent school that charges fees. They may to accept reduced fees from parents but that is through choice, There is nothing to stop a third application to be submitted for the Welsh School becoming a Free school. It seems they are being underhanded. Why was this information not offered in the planning application? Yet the term charity is banded about.



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    1. Does look suspicious

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  26. Sam has spoken to the locals and is supporting them

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    1. Sam may have spoken to the locals, but I would use the word supporting loosely. It looks like with this application you can't really be sure of who is supporting who

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    2. Council website with comments says a statement from Sam Stopp has been subnitted (bottom of page). The submission s not published. https://forms.brent.gov.uk/servlet/ep.ext?extId=751293&Other1=119004&st=PLi

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    3. Will Sam Stopp be able to Stop this planning application from being granted?

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    4. In fairness while Sam Stopp is apparently respected by most of the committee it's pretty unusual for members to overrule officers in Brent. This might be deferred but I doubt it will be refused outright.

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  27. I totally agree with this comment from Martin's latest article the case for deferral:
    If the [alternative] sites were ruled out on distance then in my opinion they are not valid to be included in the list because they were never really a truthfully viable option. If the school has been in Brent since 1958, where was the school before that? Let me remind all readers and Wembley residents that the King Edward VII Park celebrated it's 100 years centenary in 2014. The park was opened in 1914. So the park has been around for 100 years and the school being in Brent since 1958 is far too short a number of years in comparison. The school, should they be granted planning permission, will not be welcome by many Wembley residents in the park location. I feel very sorry for the school. Brent Council have failed in providing them an adequate new location that does not adversely impact on Wembley and Brent residents. BUT, the school can look elsewhere. WHY BRENT??? WHY DO WE BRENT RESIDENTS HAVE TO LOSE OUR BOWLING PAVILION AND SOME OF OUR 100 YEAR OLD PARK to this INDEPENDENT FEE PAYING SCHOOL????
    Note: NOT ALL THE SCHOOL PUPILS' PARENTS LIVE IN BRENT SO WHY CAN THEY NOT LOOK TO EALING or CAMDEN or HARROW - THEY ARE NOT WELCOME IN OUR PARK (FULL STOP)

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    1. As moderator I have published this comment because I think readers are entitled to know the depth of feeling on the issue. However on the net the use of capital letters is seen as the equivalent of shouting. Let's keep to a calm and reasoned debate.

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    2. It was good to see the numbers who turned up for the sight visit.

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    3. Yes a good turn out, plus others who wanted to come but weren't able to at that time & day.

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  28. I accidentally came across this debate whilst looking up some info about the Welsh Harp strangely enough. I have lived in this area on and off for 20 years and I use the park regularly to walk my dog.I have just read through the comments and I would like to share my opinion as I spend a lot of time in the park. I am a Londoner born and bread and I believe it is vital we have a park that is well used and full of life. Currently the park is not. It is empty most of the time. The buildings are disused. I read a comment earlier about having a cafe in the park and my response is this is Wembley not some yummy mummy zone, it is never going to have a nice cafe, with lots of nice people drinking the latest trendy coffee in it! Also what is wrong with having a school in the park, at least it will get used. In fact there is already a school and a pretty large one at that on the edge of the park and they definitely don't use the park that much after school, at least not when I'm there (which is almost every day). The only thing that comes across to me is that you don't like Welsh children wanting to learn in their own language whilst living in London . Which is a shame really as it is part of British culture. In fact, you are actually putting me off using the park as, it's a not particularly nice feeling that I share a park with such mean spirited people.

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    1. The park is in fact well use, but it would be better used if the buildings within it were given over to the community.

      Perhaps if you actually lived next to the site, you might have a different view about whether the residents objecting are "mean-spirited."

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    2. I used the park daily for up to 3 hours at varying times of day from May to August 2014 as I was advised that I needed to exercise in order to improve my health. The park was used by multiple different groups: families with young & old children, dog walkers, cyclists, people of all ages, ethnicities...etc

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    3. This is not about ethnicity at all. This is about a council being held accountable for their planning decisions. The School is a registered business. They are a registered charity as well, but only for fund raising activities. It's very easy to register for fund raising activities e.g. for sponsorship. The council has no right to give away public parkland to a private business without asking the local community about it. People need to open their eyes and see that if a council is permitted to give public parkland to a private business, what next? Where does it stop? The school being Welsh is not part of the equation. This land belongs to every single one of us in Brent and the public in general. There is absolutely no excuse for a council to give it away to a private institution. They have a duty to the public and it is seriously alarming on many levels. The park being an open space is not safe place for a school.

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    4. People were flying huge kites in the park, having disposable bbqs, doing out door exercise. to say it is not used is not correct.

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    5. The bowling pavilion is not currently used for sport, but that doesn't mean that it should be converted to a fee paying school just because it isn't being used. The pavilion could be used by many other groups for local use if given the opportunity. It is not for the council to decide who to give the pavilion to without due thought to national policy and consideration for open space.

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    6. The idea of having a cafe in the park - does not equate to having an expensive "yummy mummy zone" - cheap and cheerful cafe's do also exist. Any cafe would obviously need to market itself to the Wembley and local population in the first instance, if it were to survive.

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    7. Many parents choose to send their children to learn their native language. That is commendable. This is often done via them attending state schools during the week and language school on a saturday, sunday or both. There are also schools that teach languages the whole week through. They do not however tend to occupy public parkland to do so. There is not enough greenery in Wembley as it is.

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  29. I am a stone's throw away from the park! I have had a look into this Welsh school, checked their website and asked around about it. Seriously, it seems like a tiny school with what seems like ordinary families who want their kids to be educated in Welsh and several families by all accounts live in Brent, which makes them part of the Brent community. So I stand by my comment of mean spirited.

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    1. Anyone commenting on the spirit of others only reflects poorly on themselves

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    2. Well said. The subtle allegations of xenophobia on here are becoming very tedious.

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  30. YMDDIRIEDAETH YSGOLION CYMRAEG - THE WELSH SCHOOLS TRUST is a registered charity (registered with number 313651). The School is financed partly by a grant from the Welsh Assembly government, partly by donations from friends of the School, who form part of the wider Welsh community in London, and because of the limited availability of funding, parents are also asked to make a financial contribution, in so far as they are able to do so financially. No child is turned away and the Board has discretion to approve dispensations for individual families to ensure the School can accommodate all families in the Greater London area who would like their child to have the benefit of a Welsh medium education. The ethos of the school is that of a state school and we follow the Welsh state curriculum. In this respect, we are an inclusive school, open to all (irrespective of any family’s economic circumstances).

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    1. London Welsh School Registered Ltd Company No. 3952000

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    2. actually that's a non-limited co.

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    3. So it appears that the London Welsh School are a registered business that charges £860 per term for children aged 5 yrs and over, and has a just giving charity account for fundraising activities. Hmmm...also, they've failed twice to gain free school status.

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  31. Just to clarify, the complete lack of understanding regarding the issue of Charity Number and Company Number. This is common practice, and are known as Charitable Companies, and are governed by both charity and company Law.
    This explanation covers Charitable Companies:
    The 'charitable company' (not to be confused with the 'charitable trading company') is a form under which charities can now be set up and to which existing charitable associations or trusts can convert. In either case, a company limited by guarantee is set up with special charitable articles, and is registered both at Companies House (as a company) and with the Charity Commission as a charity in its own right. Unlike an unincorporated association or trust, a charitable company, as an incorporated body, can own property, will be liable for its own debts, and can transact business with third parties (i.e. without the need for the trustees to do so on its behalf). As a limited company, the charity will have directors and members; the directors will also be trustees of the charity for the purposes of the Charities Act. The great advantage to those running the charity is that as a limited company, only the charity is liable for its debts and the people behind it are fully protected by limited liability. Charitable companies must make returns and submit accounts on an annual basis to both Companies House and the Charity Commission, and must also comply with both charity and company law.

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